Are english biscuits the same as american cookies?

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Marley Koch asked a question: Are english biscuits the same as american cookies?
Asked By: Marley Koch
Date created: Tue, May 18, 2021 2:43 PM
Date updated: Fri, Sep 9, 2022 5:25 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Are english biscuits the same as american cookies»

As the Oxford Dictionaries blog put it: So you've got it, right? A British biscuit is an American cookie and an American cookie is a British cookie and an American biscuit is a British scone and an American scone is something else entirely. Simple!

These aren't nearly as common in the UK as they are in the US, but when they're made there, they're still called cookies… A British biscuit is an American cookie and an American cookie is a British cookie and an American biscuit is a British scone and an American scone is something else entirely. Simple!

9 other answers

The first difference between English biscuits and cookies is the way they are made. The word “cookie” originates from the Dutch word ‘Koekje’ meaning ‘little cake’. These little cakes were originally made to test the temperature of an oven before baking a real cake!

While most people will go “wait a minute, the cookie and the biscuit are the same thing”, there are actually a couple of subtle differences in the style of presentation and taste of these cookies as compared to their Old-World relatives.

You find in dictionaries (OED for example) that what the British call biscuit, is called cookie or cracker in America. But, British biscuits are like these: while American cookies are like these: and crackers are like these: They're totally different in form and character. I'm afraid the best choice would be British biscuit!.

Both, cookies and biscuits mean the same, while the difference lies in the places where they are known differently, i.e. the word ‘cookies’ is often referred to biscuits and cookies in the American countries, whereas the term, ‘biscuits’ is generally used is in the British countries. Methods for both follow the same instructions:

Biscuits and Cookies are two eatables that are often confused due to some of the similar qualities in them. In fact, they are different to a great extent.

The English spoken in England can sometimes confuse an American because the same word can mean different things in the two countries. Almost every tourist learns that in England a “lift” is an elevator. But who has been warned that an English “biscuit” is what an American calls a “cookie,” and that an American biscuit, […]

American do have things called biscuits too, but they are something completely different. These are the crumbly cakes that British people call scones, which you eat with butter, jam, sometimes clotted cream and always a cup of tea. Swede (UK) / Rutabaga (US)

Because cookies are biscuits. On a similar note, why do Americans call all biscuits cookies? Even biscuits that aren't cookies (as cookie is a specific type of biscuit, often served with chocolate chips).

Golden syrup = corn syrup. It’s an essential ingredient in many British baked good, from biscuits and flapjacks to sponge pudding and treacle tart. Corn syrup is the obvious stand-in. For best results (though nothing quite matches the buttery deliciousness of Lyle’s), try mixing light and dark Karo syrup.

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