British word for biscuit?

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Celia Jenkins asked a question: British word for biscuit?
Asked By: Celia Jenkins
Date created: Mon, Mar 22, 2021 10:24 AM
Date updated: Sun, Sep 11, 2022 6:02 PM

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Top best answers to the question «British word for biscuit»

American do have things called biscuits too, but they are something completely different. These are the crumbly cakes that British people call scones, which you eat with butter, jam, sometimes clotted cream and always a cup of tea.

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It’s not really accurate to say that “biscuit” is the British word for “cookie” or vice versa, as there are multiple different ancestries at play here. The word “cookie” comes from the Dutch koek,...

The brand name of a commercial biscuit is Hobnobs. Similar to a flapjack-digestive biscuit hybrid, they are made from rolled oats and jumbo oats, and they are among the most popular British biscuits. McVitie introduced Hobnobs in 1985 and a variant of milk chocolate in 1987.

Scone (UK) / Biscuit (US) American do have things called biscuits too, but they are something completely different. These are the crumbly cakes that British people call scones, which you eat with butter, jam, sometimes clotted cream and always a cup of tea. Swede (UK) / Rutabaga (US)

Toodle pip — An old English word that means goodbye. Twee — Small, dainty, or quaint. A very British term to describe lots of aspects of life in the United Kingdom. Taking the biscuit — if you are taking the biscuit when you are starting to push your luck.

The modern-day difference in the English language regarding the word "biscuit" is provided by British cookery writer Elizabeth David in English Bread and Yeast Cookery, in the chapter "Yeast Buns and Small Tea Cakes" and section "Soft Biscuits". She writes, It is interesting that these soft biscuits (such as scones) are common to Scotland and Guernsey, and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely ...

The word biscuit derives from the Latin bis, meaning twice, and coctus, meaning cooked. The term came into use in 14th century England to describe a confection that is baked and then dried out, to produce a hard, flat item that goes soft over time and delicious when dipped in a cup of tea.

Ah Biscuits and Gravy! I’ve tried it once and I found it to be utterly vile (Sorry America!) A biscuit is somewhat similar to a scone which is favorite for afternoon tea or a cuppa at Granny’s at the weekend which we’ll serve with either jam or cl...

In British English this is called biscuits, however, in American English this is called cookies. Now the Brits do sometimes use the word cookie to describe a particular type of biscuit with chocolate chips, but in general we say biscuit. However, we definitely don’t call this a biscuit: British English – Scone.

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