Red breast milk?

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Elza Kihn asked a question: Red breast milk?
Asked By: Elza Kihn
Date created: Sat, Mar 27, 2021 11:37 PM
Date updated: Sat, Sep 17, 2022 2:36 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Red breast milk»

  • There are basically two reasons that a mother's milk is red. Sometimes a small rupture in a blood capillary in the nipple or the breast may turn milk pink. The second reason is a bacterium called Serratia marsescens. With blood, there's not much you can do about its presence in milk except ignore it.

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There are basically two reasons that a mother's milk is red. Sometimes a small rupture in a blood capillary in the nipple or the breast may turn milk pink. The second reason is a bacterium called Serratia marsescens. With blood, there's not much you can do about its presence in milk except ignore it.

Red breast milk signals the presence of blood. Christinne Muschi/Reuters. Earlier this month, a mother's photo of her bright red breast milk was shared on the Facebook page The Milk Meg. The mother was fighting a clogged duct when her milk turned red, apparently because of blood.

Pink, Orange, and Red Breast Milk You may notice pink, orange, or red-tinged breast milk after eating foods that are naturally these colors, or after having foods or drinks that contain red, yellow, or orange food dye. Beets, orange soda, and red or orange fruit drinks can all cause your milk to turn different shades of pink, red, and orange.

Pink, Red, or Rust If you’re pumping pink, red, or rust-tinged breast milk, it could be caused by a couple of things: Again, you may have consumed food or drinks that are naturally red or pink, like beets, or made with artificial dyes

Identification of red blood cell antibodies in maternal breast milk implicated in prolonged hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Maternal RBC alloantibodies are present in breast milk and may be clinically significant in patients with prolonged recovery from HDFN.

Blood commonly causes red or pink breast milk when small vessels burst in the nipple area. And while this may sound a bit unappetizing, the milk is still perfectly safe for babies. But before writing this off as natural and completely healthy, it’s worth checking in with a doctor. One type of infectious bacteria secretes a red pigment.

Occasionally you may notice that your breast milk is streaked with red (or pink or brown) after you have expressed your milk or after your baby has spit up some breast milk after a feed. Naturally you will be worried that it might be blood and where it might have come from.

Often not urgent, but often uncomfortable, red breast milk indicates blood stream breeches, such as broken capillaries, or nipple damage. If you are experiencing pain, discomfort, or panic of any sort around the sensations you feel while breastfeeding or pumping, or the appearance of otherwise healthy milk seeming to have blood in it, it’s probably time to ask a healthcare professional if you should be concerned.

Damaged Nipples: The most common cause of red or pink streaks in breast milk is cracked nipples. Blisters , eczema, cuts, and scrapes on the areola and nipple can also cause bleeding. If your nipples are bleeding, your baby will take in some of that blood as she breastfeeds, and you may notice the blood going into your breast milk as you pump.

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