What is the jelly stuff in chicken?

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Dixie Davis asked a question: What is the jelly stuff in chicken?
Asked By: Dixie Davis
Date created: Wed, Mar 24, 2021 11:22 PM
Date updated: Tue, Jul 5, 2022 2:51 PM

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Top best answers to the question «What is the jelly stuff in chicken»

Gelatin is the jiggly substance you see after cooking meat containing bones and or skin. It is made up of proteins and water. There's no Jello without it. Gelatin comes from collagen, the proteins that make up connective tissue in animals.

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Mine had the clear jelly stuff prior to the brining. On review, it was the small connective lining between the meat and the skin.

I just cut up one of the chickens that we processed on Saturday, and found this clear goo between the skin and the flesh of the chicken. It is one that we thought we might have over-scalded, as the skin was more yellow than others. The goo has absolutely no smell at all.

It is chicken stock, essentially. When you make a good homemade stock, it should also have a jelly-like consistency when it's cold.This is because of the break down of collagen in the skin and bones of the chicken.It adds a richness to the stock that you wouldn't get if you tried to make it from boneless pieces..

The jellified gravy is just strong chicken soup with gelatin from the bones. It has little effect on health either way but can be very nice with leftover cold chicken. Or if you want to be fancy, call it aspic. 3.8K views

Gelatin is the jiggly substance you see after cooking meat containing bones and or skin. It is made up of proteins and water. There’s no Jello without it. Gelatin comes from collagen, the proteins that make up connective tissue in animals. This connective tissue (think skin, bones, cartilage and tendons) is about 30% of an animal.

I live overseas so we're celebrating Thanksgiving tomorrow-- in preparation, I used a new recipe for a large quantity of chicken stock with basis being roasted chicken wings. I chilled the stock overnight, skimmed off the fatty layer on top, and discovered that underneath all is jello.

You can find these pads in any packaged, cut meat (chicken parts, steaks, ribs, roasts, ground meats, etc.). Meat is made up of tons of cells. The cells mainly contain water. There is also water held in between the cells. As meat is handled (cut, packaged, moved, frozen, and thawed), some of that water leaks out.

Chicken today may be less flavorful than chickens that would have been raised by our grandparents. For example, those chickens took a longer time to raise, so there was a different connective tissue structure and it aged the meat differently (giving it a more gamey flavor which was great for chicken stock).

From M., 21 February 2010, "Meat jelly" - what is it? Q: Can you tell me what the delicious black jelly like substance is that settles to the bottom of beef lard that gets re-used for roasting purposes? A: Thanks for your question! I see you've come across one of my favorite things. I've always…

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