Why is my milk curdling in my coffee?

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Alejandrin Kuhlman asked a question: Why is my milk curdling in my coffee?
Asked By: Alejandrin Kuhlman
Date created: Tue, Feb 9, 2021 2:17 PM
Date updated: Thu, Jun 23, 2022 10:24 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Why is my milk curdling in my coffee»

According to Science Notes, milk sometimes curdles in coffee and tea because the acidity is just high enough to alter the pH of the milk. This usually happens when you add milk to very hot or acidic coffee or tea… Always be sure to thoroughly examine milk before you put it in your cup.

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Incidentally, the temperature of the coffee also effects the speed of milk curdling (i.e., the hotter it is, the faster the milk will curdle). So... drink your instant cold (!) and fast. I'd recommend, however, going to the store and buying a french press.

Yes, milk alternatives like almond milk, coconut milk, and soy milk can all curdle since they contain proteins. However, rather than breaking down casein (which is only in animal milk), the coffee acts as a coagulant. Typically, soy milk curdles the easiest.

Coffee and tea are both slightly acidic, although usually not enough to curdle fresh milk. When milk is just on the brink of spoilage and bacteria have produced some, but not enough acid to curdle the cold milk, a little bit of extra acid from the coffee or tea, along with their heat can tip the scale and cause the milk to curdle.

The curdling problem is most likely coming from a bad reaction when the non-dairy milk is affected by the acidity and heat of coffee. Here’s exactly how to help prevent a bad reaction.

The coffee has a higher pH than plant milk so if you add the plant milk to the coffee it may curdle on contact. If you slowly add the coffee to (warm) plant milk the pH will slowly increase and be less likely to curdle.

If you enjoy milk in your coffee or tea, you may have noticed sometimes milk immediately curdles when added to the hot beverage. Except for the chunkiness, the drink may taste perfectly fine. This is because coffee and tea contain just enough acidity to tip the pH of milk to the point of curdling.

According to Science Notes, milk sometimes curdles in coffee and tea because the acidity is just high enough to alter the pH of the milk. This usually happens when you add milk to very hot or acidic coffee or tea. As Buzzfeed reports, the heat and acidity can also affect non-dairy milks such as soy milks in a similar way.

If the problem is water so acidic that it's curdling milk OP needs to be worried about metals leaching out of the pipes and joints (lead) into the water. Everybody should test their water from time to time.

Reason No. 1: High Acidity of Your Coffee This is the number one factor which usually causes milk or cream curdling in your coffee. If the coffee which you consume on a daily basis, has a higher acetic acid content, then it basically disturbs the pH balance at a higher temperature.

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